Below you will find a series of answers to many frequently asked questions about the services and programs offered at Cobb & Douglas Public Health. If you are not able to find an answer to the questions you have within this page, please feel free to contact us for additional help.

Babies Can’t Wait (BCW) a statewide initiative that offers eligible families, throughout the state of Georgia, access to early intervention services for children (ages birth to three) who may be at risk for developmental delays or disabilities.

To be eligible for the BCW Program, the child must:

  • Be under the age of 36 months, and
  • Have a diagnosed medical condition the will result in a developmental delay, or
  • Show significant delays in development such as talking or walking.
  • If you are concerned about a child’s development, please contact the Children 1st entry line at 770-514-2759, Monday through Friday (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.).

Early Intervention services may include developmental screenings to determine the child’s delay, evaluations to determine eligibility and assessments to determine the scope of services needed. To learn more about early intervention services provided by the BCW program, please click here.

Babies Can’t Wait or Children 1st staff will provide your child with a developmental screening at no cost. Developmental screening are conducted using a tool called the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ). If the screening shows delays, the child will be referred to BCW for further testing.

Children can be in the BCW program until the day before his/her third birthday. As your child approaches his/her third birthday, a BCW coordinator will work with you and your family to determine the next steps in your child’s development.

BCW services are provided in a child’s home, daycare or any other natural environment.

Prior to enrolling in the Babies Can’t Wait program, a financial form is completed to determine costs of services/participation, if any. If a family has insurance, services provided may be billed to the insurance (or Medicaid). If there is no insurance, the family pays for services using a sliding fee scale based on the number of people in the family and the total income. Cobb & Douglas Public Health accepts these commercial insurance providers.

To refer or enroll your child in the Babies Can’t Wait program call 770-514-2759, Monday through Friday (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.)

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The BreasTEST & More program is a health initiative that offers breast and cervical cancer screenings, follow-up exams, and referral services to low-income women between the ages of 50-64 with no insurance.

Qualifying women may be eligible to receive breast exams and pap smears at no cost.  We are also able to provide referrals for no-cost mammograms.

To qualify for the BreasTest & More program, a woman must:

  • Be a Georgia resident
  • Be low- income, according to the federal poverty level (200% of the poverty level or below)
  • Not have Medicaid or Medicare or any insurance that covers mammograms
  • Be between the ages of 50-64

NOTE: Younger women may qualify for the program as funding allows.

The target age group for no-cost mammogram referrals is 50-64. Dependent on funding, other age groups may be accepted.

If you have cancer, we will assist you in completing the application for Women’s Health Medicaid. Women’s Health Medicaid offers women access to Breast and Cervical Cancer treatment through Medicaid as well as a variety of other services. Our BreasTest & More staff members will also refer you to a Breast or Cervical Cancer Specialist who will be able to care for your needs.

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Children 1st collaborates with local hospitals, physicians and other healthcare providers, schools, community-based organizations, and other agencies to identify children who are at-risk for poor health and developmental outcomes.

Is my child eligible for Children 1st?

  • Be under the age of 5 years,
  • Be identified to be at risk for poor health and developmental outcomes
  • If you are concerned about a child’s development, please contact the Children 1st Intake line at 770-514-2759, Monday through Friday (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.).

Your child can receive an initial developmental screening and assessment thru the Children 1st program. These services will be provided by a Children 1st nurse at no cost to you.

Your child can remain in the Children 1st program up to age five and enters school.   Children 1st will be available to you during this time for any developmental concerns that may arise.

Children 1st provides all services (i.e., screenings and assessments) in the home of the child. If necessary, clinic visits can be arranged.

To enroll your child in the Children 1st program please contact the Children 1st Intake line at 770-514-2759, Monday through Friday (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.).

You may also, complete the Children 1st Screening and Referral form and submit it:

For more information about the Children 1st Program, visit Georgia Division of Public Health Children 1st website.

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Children’s Medical Services, commonly referred to as CMS, is Georgia’s state and federally funded Maternal and Child Health (Title V) Children with Special Health Care Needs Program. CMS offers care coordination by nursing and professional staff for every child enrolled in the program. Every child enrolled in CMS receives periodic home visits from CMS staff. Children enrolled in CMS, from birth to age 21 with eligible chronic medical conditions, also receive comprehensive, coordinated specialty care.

Examples of eligible chronic medical conditions include, but are not limited to:

  • Cardiac, Chronic Lung (including asthma & cystic fibrosis)
  • Craniofacial anomalies (including cleft lip and/or palate)
  • Orthopedic and neuromuscular (including cerebral palsy, scoliosis & amputations)
  • Diabetes, gastrointestinal, hearing, and vision (cataracts, glaucoma, amblyopia & strabismus)
  • Spina Bifida, neurological, and neurosurgical (including epilepsy & hydrocephalus)

Eligibility for the program includes medical and financial requirements. The financial requirements are updated annually. Families with incomes greater than 150% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) through 236% of the FPL will be required to participate in the cost of care for their child. Children who are Medicaid or PeachCare enrolled, who receive SSI, and/or who are in foster care are financially eligible for CMS services.

Yes, children with Medicaid, PeachCare or other private insurance plans may qualify for the CMS program, as long as the Medical and Financial Eligibility guidelines are met. Cobb & Douglas Public Health accepts these commercial insurance providers.

As the parent or guardian of a child with special health care needs, you are the most important member of your child’s health care team. Your CMS care coordinator will help you find a Medical Specialist and other Community Services that best meet the needs of your child.

Your child’s care will usually be provided in doctors’ offices. Your child’s CMS care coordinator will work with you, as needed, to schedule and coordinate doctor visits.

If you have any questions regarding your child’s diagnosis, medication and/or treatment, you can call the doctor’s office or your CMS care coordinator for clarification.

For all children under 5 years of age, please call 770-514-2759 to apply for the CMS program. For children ages 5-21 years, please call 770-432-0578 to apply for the CMS program.

Visit the State’s website for more information on Children’s Medical Services

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), symptoms of Ebola include:

  • Fever (including low-grade)
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Weakness
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal (stomach) pain
  • Unexplained hemorrhage (bleeding or bruising)

Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola, but the average is 8 to 10 days.

Recovery from Ebola depends on good supportive clinical care and the patient’s immune response. People who recover from Ebola infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years.

For more information, visit http://dph.georgia.gov/ebola.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), when an infection does occur in humans, the virus can be spread in several ways to others. Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth) with:

  • blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola
  • objects (like needles and syringes) that have been contaminated with the virus
  • infected animals

Ebola is not spread through the air or by water, or in general, by food. However, in Africa, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats.

Only mammals (for example, humans, bats, monkeys, and apes) have shown the ability to become infected with and spread Ebola virus. There is no evidence that mosquitoes or other insects can transmit Ebola virus. Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with the blood or body fluids of sick patients. People also can become sick with Ebola after coming in contact with infected wildlife. For example, in Africa, Ebola may spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats.

The most affected countries experiencing the Ebola epidemic in West Africa are Guinea, Liberia, Mali and Sierra Leone. Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with infected blood or body fluids of sick patients. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have stated that the Ebola virus disease poses no significant risk to the United States.

During outbreaks of Ebola, the disease can spread quickly within healthcare settings (such as a clinic or hospital). Exposure to Ebola can occur in healthcare settings where hospital staff are not wearing appropriate protective equipment, including masks, gowns, and gloves and eye protection.

Dedicated medical equipment (preferable disposable, when possible) should be used by healthcare personnel providing patient care. Proper cleaning and disposal of instruments, such as needles and syringes, is also important. If instruments are not disposable, they must be sterilized before being used again. Without adequate sterilization of the instruments, virus transmission can continue and amplify an outbreak.

In Africa, Ebola may spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats, as well as spread through poor hygienic conditions where the virus can spread through contact with objects (like clothes, bedding, needles, syringes/sharps or medical equipment) that have been contaminated with the virus or with infected animals

Once someone recovers from Ebola, they can no longer spread the virus. However, Ebola virus has been found in semen for up to 3 months. Abstinence from sex (including oral sex) is recommended for at least 3 months. If abstinence is not possible, condoms may help prevent the spread of disease.