Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)2018-08-03T20:52:28+00:00

Below you will find a series of answers to many frequently asked questions about the services and programs offered at Cobb & Douglas Public Health. If you are not able to find an answer to the questions you have within this page, please feel free to contact us for additional help.

Babies Can’t Wait (BCW) a statewide initiative that offers eligible families, throughout the state of Georgia, access to early intervention services for children (ages birth to three) who may be at risk for developmental delays or disabilities.

To be eligible for the BCW Program, the child must:

  • Be under the age of 36 months, and
  • Have a diagnosed medical condition the will result in a developmental delay, or
  • Show significant delays in development such as talking or walking.
  • If you are concerned about a child’s development, please contact the Children 1st entry line at 770-514-2759, Monday through Friday (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.).

Early Intervention services may include developmental screenings to determine the child’s delay, evaluations to determine eligibility and assessments to determine the scope of services needed. To learn more about early intervention services provided by the BCW program, please click here.

Babies Can’t Wait or Children 1st staff will provide your child with a developmental screening at no cost. Developmental screening are conducted using a tool called the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ). If the screening shows delays, the child will be referred to BCW for further testing.

Children can be in the BCW program until the day before his/her third birthday. As your child approaches his/her third birthday, a BCW coordinator will work with you and your family to determine the next steps in your child’s development.

BCW services are provided in a child’s home, daycare or any other natural environment.

Prior to enrolling in the Babies Can’t Wait program, a financial form is completed to determine costs of services/participation, if any. If a family has insurance, services provided may be billed to the insurance (or Medicaid). If there is no insurance, the family pays for services using a sliding fee scale based on the number of people in the family and the total income. Cobb & Douglas Public Health accepts these commercial insurance providers.

To refer or enroll your child in the Babies Can’t Wait program call 770-514-2759, Monday through Friday (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.)

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The BreasTEST & More program is a health initiative that offers breast and cervical cancer screenings, follow-up exams, and referral services to low-income women between the ages of 50-64 with no insurance.

Qualifying women may be eligible to receive breast exams and pap smears at no cost.  We are also able to provide referrals for no-cost mammograms.

To qualify for the BreasTest & More program, a woman must:

  • Be a Georgia resident
  • Be low- income, according to the federal poverty level (200% of the poverty level or below)
  • Not have Medicaid or Medicare or any insurance that covers mammograms
  • Be between the ages of 50-64

NOTE: Younger women may qualify for the program as funding allows.

The target age group for no-cost mammogram referrals is 50-64. Dependent on funding, other age groups may be accepted.

If you have cancer, we will assist you in completing the application for Women’s Health Medicaid. Women’s Health Medicaid offers women access to Breast and Cervical Cancer treatment through Medicaid as well as a variety of other services. Our BreasTest & More staff members will also refer you to a Breast or Cervical Cancer Specialist who will be able to care for your needs.

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Children 1st collaborates with local hospitals, physicians and other healthcare providers, schools, community-based organizations, and other agencies to identify children who are at-risk for poor health and developmental outcomes.

Is my child eligible for Children 1st?

  • Be under the age of 5 years,
  • Be identified to be at risk for poor health and developmental outcomes
  • If you are concerned about a child’s development, please contact the Children 1st Intake line at 770-514-2759, Monday through Friday (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.).

Your child can receive an initial developmental screening and assessment thru the Children 1st program. These services will be provided by a Children 1st nurse at no cost to you.

Your child can remain in the Children 1st program up to age five and enters school.   Children 1st will be available to you during this time for any developmental concerns that may arise.

Children 1st provides all services (i.e., screenings and assessments) in the home of the child. If necessary, clinic visits can be arranged.

To enroll your child in the Children 1st program please contact the Children 1st Intake line at 770-514-2759, Monday through Friday (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.).

You may also, complete the Children 1st Screening and Referral form and submit it:

For more information about the Children 1st Program, visit Georgia Division of Public Health Children 1st website.

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Children’s Medical Services, commonly referred to as CMS, is Georgia’s state and federally funded Maternal and Child Health (Title V) Children with Special Health Care Needs Program. CMS offers care coordination by nursing and professional staff for every child enrolled in the program. Every child enrolled in CMS receives periodic home visits from CMS staff. Children enrolled in CMS, from birth to age 21 with eligible chronic medical conditions, also receive comprehensive, coordinated specialty care.

Examples of eligible chronic medical conditions include, but are not limited to:

  • Cardiac, Chronic Lung (including asthma & cystic fibrosis)
  • Craniofacial anomalies (including cleft lip and/or palate)
  • Orthopedic and neuromuscular (including cerebral palsy, scoliosis & amputations)
  • Diabetes, gastrointestinal, hearing, and vision (cataracts, glaucoma, amblyopia & strabismus)
  • Spina Bifida, neurological, and neurosurgical (including epilepsy & hydrocephalus)

Eligibility for the program includes medical and financial requirements. The financial requirements are updated annually. Families with incomes greater than 150% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) through 236% of the FPL will be required to participate in the cost of care for their child. Children who are Medicaid or PeachCare enrolled, who receive SSI, and/or who are in foster care are financially eligible for CMS services.

Yes, children with Medicaid, PeachCare or other private insurance plans may qualify for the CMS program, as long as the Medical and Financial Eligibility guidelines are met. Cobb & Douglas Public Health accepts these commercial insurance providers.

As the parent or guardian of a child with special health care needs, you are the most important member of your child’s health care team. Your CMS care coordinator will help you find a Medical Specialist and other Community Services that best meet the needs of your child.

Your child’s care will usually be provided in doctors’ offices. Your child’s CMS care coordinator will work with you, as needed, to schedule and coordinate doctor visits.

If you have any questions regarding your child’s diagnosis, medication and/or treatment, you can call the doctor’s office or your CMS care coordinator for clarification.

For all children under 5 years of age, please call 770-514-2759 to apply for the CMS program. For children ages 5-21 years, please call 770-432-0578 to apply for the CMS program.

Visit the State’s website for more information on Children’s Medical Services

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Yes, appointments are scheduled to ensure our patients receive the best services possible. We are unable to accept walk-in patients unless it is an emergency. To schedule an appointment or for emergency walk-in services, please call 770-514-2372

Unfortunately, the dental clinic does not provide free services, nor are we able to offer services based on a sliding fee scale. All of our services are set at reasonably low prices for all uninsured and underinsured patients (commonly referred to as self-pay patients).

Yes, the dental clinic accepts a variety of insurance plans, including Medicaid, Peachstate, WellCare, and Amerigroup dental plans. Cobb & Douglas Public Health accepts these commercial insurance providers.

If you are experiencing severe pain and cannot contact us, please leave a message and one of our staff members will contact you as soon possible. For immediate assistance, we recommend visiting the emergency room or an immediate/urgent care facility.

The dental clinic offers services to all children between the ages of 2-18.

The Dental Clinic is located at the Marietta Health Center:

1650 County Services Parkway
Marietta, Georgia 30008
(770) 514-2372

Please refer to our Locations & Hours page for more information on services provided and clinic hours.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), symptoms of Ebola include:

  • Fever (including low-grade)
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Weakness
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal (stomach) pain
  • Unexplained hemorrhage (bleeding or bruising)

Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola, but the average is 8 to 10 days.

Recovery from Ebola depends on good supportive clinical care and the patient’s immune response. People who recover from Ebola infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years.

For more information, visit http://dph.georgia.gov/ebola.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), when an infection does occur in humans, the virus can be spread in several ways to others. Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth) with:

  • blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola
  • objects (like needles and syringes) that have been contaminated with the virus
  • infected animals

Ebola is not spread through the air or by water, or in general, by food. However, in Africa, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats.

Only mammals (for example, humans, bats, monkeys, and apes) have shown the ability to become infected with and spread Ebola virus. There is no evidence that mosquitoes or other insects can transmit Ebola virus. Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with the blood or body fluids of sick patients. People also can become sick with Ebola after coming in contact with infected wildlife. For example, in Africa, Ebola may spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats.

The most affected countries experiencing the Ebola epidemic in West Africa are Guinea, Liberia, Mali and Sierra Leone. Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with infected blood or body fluids of sick patients. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have stated that the Ebola virus disease poses no significant risk to the United States.

During outbreaks of Ebola, the disease can spread quickly within healthcare settings (such as a clinic or hospital). Exposure to Ebola can occur in healthcare settings where hospital staff are not wearing appropriate protective equipment, including masks, gowns, and gloves and eye protection.

Dedicated medical equipment (preferable disposable, when possible) should be used by healthcare personnel providing patient care. Proper cleaning and disposal of instruments, such as needles and syringes, is also important. If instruments are not disposable, they must be sterilized before being used again. Without adequate sterilization of the instruments, virus transmission can continue and amplify an outbreak.

In Africa, Ebola may spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats, as well as spread through poor hygienic conditions where the virus can spread through contact with objects (like clothes, bedding, needles, syringes/sharps or medical equipment) that have been contaminated with the virus or with infected animals

Once someone recovers from Ebola, they can no longer spread the virus. However, Ebola virus has been found in semen for up to 3 months. Abstinence from sex (including oral sex) is recommended for at least 3 months. If abstinence is not possible, condoms may help prevent the spread of disease.

Please be aware that the symptoms of fever (including low grade), headache, joint and muscle aches, weakness, fatigue, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain and lack of appetite, and in some cases bleeding alone are not indicative of Ebola virus disease (EVD).

Health care providers should be alert for, and evaluate any patient who has had travel during the 21 days before symptom onset from an Ebola-affected area OR had contact with an individual who has Ebola.

AND

Ebola symptoms: fever (including low-grade), headache, weakness, muscle pain, vomiting, loss of appetite, fatigue, diarrhea, abdominal pain or hemorrhage.

If a patient meets this criteria:

  • Isolate patient in single room with a private bathroom and with the door to hallway closed
  • Implement standard, contact, and droplet precautions (gown, facemask, eye protection, and gloves)
  • Notify the hospital Infection Control Program and other appropriate staff
  • Evaluate for any risk exposures for EVD
  • IMMEDIATELY report to the DPH (1-866-PUB-HLTH) or Cobb & Douglas Public Health (770-514-2300) to discuss screening, infection control, laboratory testing and recommended infection control measures.
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The Family Planning Program offers health education, health care and family planning to help women and men stay healthy and have healthy babies. These services strengthen families and communities throughout Cobb and Douglas County by promoting personal responsibility and economic self-sufficiency.

Yes, the family planning clinic accepts walk-in patients.  The number of walk-in patients we see each day varies depending our clinic staff and the number of patients who have not kept their appointment.

Yes, the family planning clinic offers same day appointments. Similar to walk-in patients, the number of same-day appointments varies each day depending our clinic staff and patient load.

The family planning clinic accepts Visa, MasterCard and Cash.  Unfortunately, we are unable to accept checks.

No, family planning patients see either a Nurse Practitioner or a specially trained Registered Nurse.

No, the Family Planning Clinic accepts patients from all counties throughout the state of Georgia.

The family planning clinic accepts these commercial insurance providers. We do accept Medicaid.

No, the family planning clinic does not provide medical services. We only provide Family Planning services.

You can get your Depo Provera or birth control pills from us only if you want to become a patient of Cobb & Douglas Public Health. Unfortunately, we are unable to provide Depo Provera or birth control pills to patients with any other primary provider.

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Please refer to the basic requirements to open a restaurant in Cobb and Douglas counties.

Basic requirements for mobile food units (i.e. food trucks) can be found here.

To obtain a food service permit, please review the resources located here, and complete the appropriate application and submit it, along with the applicable fees,  to the appropriate Environmental Health office.  An Environmental Health Specialist will then contact you to guide you through the permitting process.

To report a foodborne illness, please call 770-435-7815 or complete a Report a Foodborne Illness Form.

Please contact your area inspector at 770-435-7815 for a consultation.

The best way to prepare your establishment for inspection under the Georgia Food Code is to eliminate all risk factors. Please click here for a reference guide on how to better prepare your establishment for an inspection under the new Georgia Food Code.

Please click here for more information regarding water interruption precautions and preparation.

The following signs are to be posted in most food service facilities:

  • Choking Aid: This sign is to be posted and maintained in clear view of guests and workers in a conspicuous place or places on the premises—usually in the dining area(s)–for use in the event of a choking emergency, as required by the department
  • No Smoking/Smoking Permitted: A sign bearing the words ‘No Smoking’ or the international ‘No Smoking’ symbol shall be placed on all entrances or in a position clearly visible upon entry into food service facilities.  If a food service establishment has a smoking exemption that is compliant with the Georgia Smokefree Air Act, signage must be posted that states ‘Smoking Permitted, No One Under the Age of 18 Allowed’ on all entrances or in a position clearly visible upon entry into the food service establishment.
  • Employees Must Wash Hands: Handwashing Signage:  A sign or poster that notifies food service employees to wash their hands shall be provided at all handwashing sinks that are used by them.

Links to these signs and other resources are provided for your use at the Georgia Department of Public Health’s website; however, you may provide your own.  Keep in mind that your No Smoking sign must state the Georgia code provision that applies:  O.C.G.A. § 31-12A-1 et seq.

Our Employee Health requirements are located in 511-6-1-.03(4) within the Rules and Regulations for Food Service. The person-in-charge (PIC) should be able to show that all of the facility’s conditional and established food employees have been informed of the reporting requirements and that the PIC knows when to restrict and exclude food workers, as well as how to determine when they are allowed to return to work in accordance with all applicable rules and regulations.  The following documents will assist you with compliance; however, you are welcome to use other documents that cover the same elements:

When determining who will be designated as a Certified Food Safety Manager (CFSM) for your food service facility,  please keep in mind that the CFSM must be a person with authority over the establishment’s operation, such as a manager or owner.

The following Food Safety Management courses are accepted:

  • ServSafe
  • Prometric, Inc.
  • National Registry of Food and Drug Officials
  • 360training.com, Inc.

For more information on classes, please visit our Food Safety Training page.

The latest update to the Georgia Department of Public Health’s Rules and Regulations for Food Service does allow for after hours (a.k.a. key drop) deliveries if certain conditions are met.  Basic guidelines for this delivery method and a sample of a contractual agreement can be found at the following links:

The eight foods most common food allergens are:

  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Fish
  • Crustacean shellfish
  • Tree nuts
  • Peanuts
  • Wheat
  • Soybeans

For more information on food allergens, please check out the information provided at: http://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm079311.htm

Please click here for information on how to develop an emergency action plan for your food service facility.

The cleanup process that occurs after a vomit or fecal event is very important since these substances may be contaminated with highly infectious pathogens, such as norovirus.  Norovirus is a highly contagious microorganism – as few as 10 viral particles can make you  sick, and a single vomiting incident can spread as many as 300,000 viral particles into the environment.  Matters are further complicated by the fact that norovirus is resistant to many disinfectants, so choosing the right product for disinfection is essential.

The following materials are provided to help guide you through the safe and effective cleanup of vomit or fecal material:

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HIV

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that can lead to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS. You may hear that someone is HIV infected, has HIV infection, or has HIV disease. These are all terms that mean the person has HIV in his or her body and can pass the virus to other people.

AIDS is a late stage of HIV disease.  When a person has AIDS their CD4 Count (measures the strength of the immune system) falls below 200.

Georgia is currently the 6th leading state in HIV cases with a rate of 410.3 persons per 100,000 population. In 2011, there were 18,535 HIV Cases and 23,451 AIDS Cases in the state.

In 2011, Georgia Department of Public Health reported that there were 1,087 cases of HIV and 1,312 cases of AIDS living in Cobb and Douglas Counties combined. An average of 73 new cases of HIV and 66 cases of AIDS are reported each year.

Overall, crude rates have steadily increased over the years in Cobb and Douglas Counties and in Georgia.

No, there is not an average HIV patient since the disease affects all races, ages, genders and socioeconomic levels.

Those at most risk are people who:

  • Have “unprotected sex” with someone who has HIV. Unprotected sex means vaginal, anal, or oral sex without using a condom.
  • Share needles, syringes, or other equipment to inject drugs, steroids, or even vitamins or medicine with someone who has HIV.
  • Work in health care and maintenance workers who may be exposed to blood and/or body fluids at work sometimes get infected through on-the-job exposures like needle-stick injuries.

Babies can potentially become infected during their mother’s pregnancy (if she is HIV+), during delivery, or immediately after birth.  They can also become infected through breastfeeding

Cobb & Douglas Public Health offers walk-in opt-out testing for HIV in the Adult Health Clinic, Monday – Friday from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Please call 770-514-2380 for more information.

Cobb & Douglas Public Health also sponsors special free HIV testing events throughout the year at various public health centers and locations. You can check our website, Facebook page, Twitter or call 770-514-2815 for more information on HIV Prevention outreach and testing events.

Capstone Health, Cobb & Douglas Public Health’s (CDPH) HIV Program, is housed in the Marietta Health Center. Capstone Health provides comprehensive, primary care services and medications to an average of 700 patients per year.  Capstone Health also provides social work, wellness and substance abuse counseling.

1650 County Services Parkway
Marietta, Ga. 30008
770-514-2464
Monday – Friday   8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.& 2:00 p.m.– 4:30p.m.
(By appointment only)

We do not accept Walk-In Clients.

The cost of services depends on the number of people in your family and your income (a sliding fee scale).

Currently, Cobb & Douglas Public Health accepts these commercial insurance providers.

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Vaccinations are administered to protect clients from vaccine preventable diseases. These vaccinations are developed to reduce the risk of infection by developing immunity to the disease over a period of time. The mission of the Immunization Clinic at Cobb & Douglas Public Health is to ensure that immunization rates remain high and vaccine preventable diseases remain low by making sure all clients receive the vaccines they need.

Clients who opt-out of getting vaccinated, not only put themselves at risk of getting vaccine preventable diseases, but also put other individuals (who are unable to be vaccinated) at risk for getting vaccine preventable diseases. Vaccine preventable diseases can be dangerous, and in some cases deadly. For more information on the importance of vaccinations, please visit http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/vaccine-decision/prevent-diseases.html

Yes, the Immunization Clinic administers the Shingles (Herpes Zoster) vaccination. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Shingles vaccine is recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to reduce the risk of shingles and its associated pain in people 60 years old or older. For more information on the Shingles (Herpes Zoster) vaccine please visit http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/shingles.html

Cobb & Douglas Public Health is able to bill the commercial insurance providers listed here  /accepted-insurance/

Cash, Visa and MasterCard will also be accepted.

No, clients do not need an appointment to receive routine immunizations in the Immunization Clinic. Vaccines are administered on a first come, first serve basis. Please see our clinic locations and hours page for more information and hours of operation.

**Please Note: Due to the high volume of clients we see during “Back to School” immunizations, we may have to suspend services early.

Yes, appointments are needed for travel health services.  Please call the Travel Health Clinic at 770-514-2485 to make an appointment for travel services.

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Vaccinations are administered to protect clients from vaccine-preventable diseases. These vaccinations are developed to reduce the risk of infection by developing immunity to the disease over a period of time. The mission of the Immunization Clinic at Cobb & Douglas Public Health is to ensure that immunization rates remain high and vaccine preventable diseases remain low by making sure all clients receive the vaccines they need.

Clients who opt-out of getting vaccinated, not only put themselves at risk of getting vaccine-preventable diseases, but also put other individuals (who are unable to be vaccinated) at risk for getting vaccine preventable diseases. Vaccine-preventable diseases can be dangerous, and in some cases deadly. For more information on the importance of vaccinations, please click here.

It is recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) that infants, children, adolescents, adults, and elders be vaccinated at some point in his or her life. Required vaccinations may vary based on a number of factors including age and medical history. For a full list of recommended immunizations based on age group, please see the links below:

If your Child is 0 to 18 years of age and has no health insurance, is on Medicaid, has PeachCare or insurance that does not cover the vaccine he/she is eligible for vaccines provided through the Vaccines for Children Program.  There is an administration fee of $21.90 charged per vaccine for vaccine supplied by the Vaccines for Children Program, however no child will be denied service for inability to pay this administration fee.

Cash, Discover, Visa and MasterCard will also be accepted.

For a list of accepted commercial insurance providers, please check here.

To ensure your child receives the required and/or recommended immunizations, please bring the following information with you:

  • Your child’s immunization record
  • Your child’s insurance information

Yes, the Immunization Clinic can complete an Immunization Certificate (Form 3231) and administer any immunizations based on the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations and State of Georgia requirements. Please bring your child in with his or her immunization record to receive the required vaccines and to obtain a completed Immunization Certificate. For a summary of Georgia Immunization Requirements for Child Care and School Attendance, please click here.

Yes, the Immunization Clinic is able to provide all students with the required and/or recommended vaccines and a completed Immunization Verification form when requested. For more information about which vaccines are required and which vaccines should be considered for students attending a Georgia public college, please click here. We are only able to print verification forms for students attending a college in Georgia. If you are attending a college out of the state, please bring your Immunization Verification form with you.

No, clients do not need an appointment to receive immunizations in the Immunization Clinic. Vaccines are administered on a first come, first serve basis. Please see our clinic locations and hours page for more information.

**Please Note: Due to the high volume of clients we see during “Back to School” immunizations, we may have to suspend services early.

*Immunizations for travel require an appointment. Please call Travel Health Services at 770-514-2485 to schedule an appointment.

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Anyone who has not received the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine is at risk of contracting measles. Children under age 5 and adults over the age of 20 who have not been vaccinated are most likely to develop complications from measles infections, such as pneumonia.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, you are considered protected from measles if you have written documentation (records) showing at least one of the following:

  • You received two doses of measles-containing vaccine, and you are a(n)—
    • school-aged child (grades K-12)
    • adult who was not vaccinated as a child and will be in a setting that poses a high risk for measles transmission, including students at post-high school education institutions, healthcare personnel, and international travelers.
  • You received one dose of measles-containing vaccine, and you are a(n)—
    • preschool-aged child
    • adult who was not vaccinated as a child and will not be in a high-risk setting for measles transmission.
  • A laboratory confirmed that you had measles at some point in your life.
  • A laboratory confirmed that you are immune to measles.
  • You were born before 1957.

If you’re unsure whether you’re immune to measles, you should first try to find your vaccination records or documentation of measles immunity. If you do not have written documentation of measles immunity, you should get vaccinated with measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Another option is to have a doctor test your blood to determine whether you’re immune, but this option is likely to cost more and will take two doctor’s visits. There is no harm in getting another dose of MMR vaccine if you may already be immune to measles (or mumps or rubella).

Measles is primarily a concern in the United States due to travel of unvaccinated individuals (Americans and visitors) from other countries where measles is still a common disease into the United States, and pockets of unvaccinated individuals living in the nation.

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You:

  • Must be 18 years’ old
  • Must complete a profile in ServGA
  • Must complete required paperwork, have a background check, and attend an orientation
  • Must complete basic NIMS training (IS 100, 200, 700, 800, & 808) within 60 days of orientation.
  • *Training is ongoing process as we deal with disasters and community preparedness.
  • Please contact the MRC Coordinator for more details on becoming a CDMRC volunteer.

The State Emergency Registry of Volunteers in Georgia (ServGA) is a volunteer gateway system that is used to pre-credential volunteers before a disaster occurs. ServGA helps to effectively organize, coordinate and mobilize volunteers, to respond in a disaster. This alleviates the issues associated with non-certified and spontaneous volunteers simply showing up at disaster sites. Volunteers with CDMRC must be pre-credentialed to respond to disaster and mobilize when there is a community need.

We meet on Saturdays on a quarterly basis, however on-going training is involved, as we deal with disasters and community preparedness. These additional trainings are scheduled throughout the year.

Yes, some trainings can be done online, free of charge.   You can find the NIMS trainings (IS 100, 200, 700, 800, & 808), among others, on the FEMA training website, under Independent study.

Please go to https://training.fema.gov/is/

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The pharmacy is located on the main level of the Marietta Health Center. The pharmacy is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

No, both new prescriptions and refills will only be filled once the patient requests the service at the pharmacy.

No. Patients with Insurance coverage should get their medications filled at the nearest retail pharmacy. The public health pharmacy is organized to serve those patients with limited financial means of obtaining medications.

The prices of medications depend on where the patient received care as well as the type of medication they are receiving. Prescriptions range in price from $0.00 to $50.00 depending on the program.

All vaccines are administered in the vaccination clinic by a nurse or physician. The pharmacy is responsible for ordering and storing vaccinations that are used in the clinic.

A patient can only receive a one month (30 day) supply. Regardless of the frequency of doses, the patient receives enough for four weeks. (i.e. 1 tablet taken 4 times a day = 120 tablets for a month’s supply)

Prescriptions can be paid with cash, Visa, Mastercard, or Debit cards with the Visa or Mastercard logo.

No. The pharmacy is organized to only fill prescriptions from within the Health Department, or from sites that are affiliated with the Health Department. (i.e. Family Health Center at Cobb, Cobb Hospital Clinic, or Kennestone Hospital Clinic). Prescriptions from the Emergency Department or specialty physicians cannot be filled here.

Yes. The pharmacy along with the health department promotes safe sex. Condoms are free with prescriptions written from the family planning department for oral contraceptives. However, condoms are sold for the price of $2.00 for 10 condoms.

When refilling a prescription, it is preferred that patients bring their old medication bottle for easier and faster service. If the patient does not have the bottle at the time of refill, the medication can be found in our computer system by birth date and may take more time for the pharmacy as well as increase the waiting time for the patient.

The pharmacy has a limited stock of prescriptions due to the restricted formularies provided by the various health programs. The pharmacy does not have any controlled medications or over-the-counter medications.

Prescriptions that are not available in our pharmacy can be filled at an outside retail pharmacy. It should be noted that the prices at these pharmacies differ from the prices at our pharmacy.

It is against the law to dispense medications without a written prescription from the doctor. Therefore, if there are no remaining refills left on the prescription, a patient cannot just buy more of their medication. The patient would need to receive a new prescription from their physician.

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We recommend you drop by the health department for prenatal screening. If you have proof of pregnancy, bring this with you. If you do not have one, we will advise you on how to get one.

Bring a picture ID, proof of family income, birth certificate or U.S. passport and medical proof of pregnancy.

Proof of pregnancy is a statement of pregnancy usually provided by a health or medical facility like a hospital, doctor’s office, health department, or pregnancy center. It must have your name, statement of pregnancy, and a medical signature by a doctor or nurse.  Your prenatal records or an Emergency Room discharge summary can also serve as proof of pregnancy.

Generally, the Medicaid application process for pregnancy is faster through the health department than an application placed at DFCS or online. At the time your application is processed, you will know whether you are eligible for Medicaid or not. If you are eligible for Medicaid, you can get started with prenatal care as soon as you leave the health department.

Yes, through our Perinatal Case Management program our staff will provide you with information to help you get started with prenatal care. We will give you a list of local doctors who accept Medicaid.

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Yes, the STI/STD clinic accepts walk-in patients.  The number of walk-in patients we see each day varies depending our clinic staff and the number of patients who have not kept their appointment.

Yes, the STI/STD clinic offers same day appointments. Similar to walk-in patients, the number of same-day appointments varies each day depending our clinic staff and patient load.

Unfortunately, we are unable to provide free services to STI/STD patients. The cost depends on the number of people in your family and your income (a sliding fee scale). We ask that you provide proof of income the day of your appointment.  Acceptable Proof of Income includes:

  • Two recent pay stubs (One pay stub is acceptable in some cases)
  • 2013 W-2 or Tax papers
  • Award letter from Unemployment or Disability
  • Financial Aid/Loan Paperwork (College students)
  • High School Students (ages 18 and older) must bring a Progress Report or School ID with the current school year on it

Without acceptable Proof of Income, the cost of STI/STD services is $111.00. Dependent on income and family size, the cost of STI/STD services is $88.80, $66.60, $44.40 or $27.75 for new clients.

No, STI/STD patients see either a Nurse Practitioner or a specially-trained Registered Nurse.

No, the STI/STD Clinic provides services to patients from all counties throughout the state of Georgia.

The  STI/STD clinic accepts the commercial insurance providers listed at /accepted-insurance/

We do accept Medicaid.

No, the STI/STD clinic does not provide medical services. We only provide STI/STD services.

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  • Mail yearly fees to Cobb Public Health or Douglas Public Health, Center for Environmental Health. If necessary update your application for a swimming pool permit and mail it along with the established fee. An application may be obtained here.
  • Remove the cover from the pool and clean any leaves and debris from the pool and the skimmers.
  • Inspect the pumps, filters and the flow meter on the return line and ensure that they are in good condition and functioning properly. The sand in the filters may require changing if it is excessively dirty or has hardened in the filter over the course of the winter. Check with a local pool service for assistance if needed.
  • Check the skimmers to ensure that they are all free flowing and unobstructed. Inspect the skimmer’s equalizer check valves, float valves and weirs to assure that they are installed correctly and are in good working condition.
  • Evaluate the main drains to ensure that they are in good condition. Replace any missing or broken main drain grates.
  • Check the chlorinator to ensure that the lines are not clogged and that they are working properly.
  • Once the pool has been cleaned and the recirculation and filtration systems are working properly, begin treating the water and adjusting the chemicals. It may take several weeks to a month before the water is properly balanced. Check with a local pool company for assistance with your pool needs.
  • If the emergency telephone was disconnected during the winter, contact the phone company and restore the service. Make sure that the telephone is in good working condition and replace it if it has been stolen or vandalized during the off season.
  • Properly install and tighten all ladders and handrails. Check the bottom ends of the ladders and ensure that the rubber boot caps are installed. (This prevents the ladder from etching into the shell of the pool.)
  • Check to see if the water fountains, showers and other faucets are working properly and free of leaks.
  • Check fences and gates for damage and defects. The gates must be self-closing and self-latching. Make repairs as necessary.
  • Clean bathhouse facilities and stock them with toilet tissue, soap and paper towels. Provide trash containers in each restroom facility and at least one trash container within the pool enclosure.
  • Install safety equipment at the pool. This includes, but is not limited to:
    • An easily readable pool rules sign posted in a conspicuous location
    • A shepherd’s hook attached to a minimum 12 foot, non-telescoping pole
    • A U.S. Coast Guard approved throwing buoy with a line attached that is 1.5 times the width of the pool or 50 ft., whichever is longer
    • A multi-colored float line installed at the slope break, for pools greater than 5 feet deep
    • A 2 inch black strip on the top front edge of each step, egress or bench
    • Depth markers indicated in feet on both the tile line and deck surface at the shallow end, the slope break, deep end, and other required intervals.
    • “No Diving” marked on the deck with 2 inch (minimum) lettering at pool depths of 5 ft. or less
    • A properly supplied first aid kit.
    • A “Warning No Lifeguard on Duty” sign with 4 inch (minimum) lettering posted in a conspicuous location.
    • A sign noting the location of the pool phone and emergency use directions. (i.e. “Dial 911”)
  • Test the pool chemicals with a DPD type pool test kit and adjust the chemicals to the proper levels:
    • Minimum chlorine residual (unstabilized):
      • Standard pool: 1 ppm
      • Spa: 3 ppm
      • All other pool types (wading, spray pad, interactive, water attractions): 2 ppm.
    • Minimum chlorine residual (stabilized/use cyanuric acid):
      • Standard pool: 2 ppm
      • Spa: 3 ppm
      • All other pool types (wading, spray pad, interactive, water attractions): 2 ppm.
    • Maximum chlorine residual (stabilized or unstabilized):
      • All pools: 10 ppm
    • Minimum bromine residual:
      • Pool: 3 ppm
      • Spa: 4 ppm
    • Maximum bromine residual:
      • All pools: 8 ppm
  • Call the Center for Environmental Health to schedule an inspection. (Cobb: (770) 435-7815/ Douglas: (770) 920-7311 If the pool does not pass the initial inspection, correct the violations noted on the inspection and schedule a re-inspection. The pool may open only after passing an inspection.

The Cobb and Douglas County Boards of Health Rules and Regulations for Swimming Pools states that all pre-1985 pools in Cobb and Douglas County will now be required to have either two main drains or a single drain with a properly secured anti-entrapment cover. Any pool built after 1985 must have two main drains.

Additionally, any swimming pool, wading pool, spa, etc. which undergoes a renovation such as replastering, interior repainting, or any other modification that requires draining of the pool, shall submit specifications for review to the appropriate Center for Environmental Health with the understanding that the pool or spa must adhere to the current Rules and Regulations for Swimming Pools.

All existing single main drain pools must install either two main drains or a secure anti-entrapment cover. The pool owner or operator should also address the requirements of the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act (see other FAQs for details) when making any main drain modifications. By addressing this situation, the risk of suction entrapment or hair entanglement of swimmers will be greatly reduced.

Thank you for your cooperation in this effort to ensure swimmer safety. If you have any questions, please contact your local Center for Environmental Health (Cobb: 770-435-7815, Douglas: 770-920-7311).

A pool must close under the following conditions.

  • Disinfectant and/or pH out of acceptable range
  • Main drain grate not visible
  • Main drain grate missing or damaged
  • Poor recirculation of the pool water due to:
  • Pumps or filters not operating properly
  • Less than 50% of skimmers operating
  • Lack of safety equipment (life ring and/or shepherd’s hook)
  • Emergency telephone missing or inoperative
  • Chemical feeders or filters inoperative
  • Fecal accidents or contamination of pool water with vomitus or blood
  • Non-compliant pool barrier/enclosure
  • Any other condition deemed to be an imminent health or safety hazard by the department

General Requirements 

All swimming pools under the jurisdiction of Cobb & Douglas Public Health are required to have an operable, hard-wired, weatherproof telephone, with direct 911 access or capability.  The emergency phone must be installed in a conspicuous location, and it must be available to bathers and pool staff at all times.  A sign stating “EMERGENCY 911” must be posted by the emergency phone.  Directions to the phone’s location must be conspicuously posted if the telephone is not readily visible within the pool area.

It is also extremely important that pool emergency phones have their location verified with 911 operators.  An unverified emergency phone may have the address of an adjacent property associated with its phone number, which could result in unnecessary delays from emergency medical technicians (EMTs).  A verified emergency phone number will let the 911 operator know that the emergency situation is occuring at your swimming pool and assure that EMTs can arrive as quickly as possible.

Cell Phones 

Because cell phones are not usually at a defined location, are not provided with a continuous power supply, and do not provide accurate caller location information to 911 operators, they do not afford the public reliable means to call for assistance in the event of an emergency. For this reason, it has been the policy of Cobb & Douglas Public Health to prohibit the use of cell phones as an emergency phone for a swimming pool.

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FOR ALL POOLS: 

  • Pool rules (in minimum 1 inch letters) posted at or near the pool’s entrance shall state the following:
    • Pool Risks:
      • Shower before entering the pool.
      • Children shall not use pool without an adult in attendance.
      • Adults shall not swim alone.
      • All children three years old and younger and any child not potty-trained must wear snug fitting plastic pants or a water resistant swim diaper.
      • Do not swim if the suction outlets are missing, broken, or not clearly visible from the deck.
      • No glass articles allowed in or around pool.
      • Do not swallow the pool water.
      • Do not dive unless diving area is clear of other bathers.
      • Do not swim if you had diarrhea within the past two weeks.
      • No animals are allowed in the pool or pool enclosure, except service animals are allowed on the deck.
  • A sign stating “EMERGENCY 911” shall be posted at the telephone.
  • A sign stating the pool’s hours of operation shall be posted at or near the pool entrance.
  • A sign stating the pool’s bathing load in at least 4 inch letters shall be posted at or near the pool entrance.

FOR POOLS WHERE THESE CONDITIONS ARE APPLICABLE: 

Where lifeguards are not provided or at lifeguarded pools with “swim at your own risk” periods:

  • Signs shall be posted in a conspicuous location at or near the pool entrance that state in at least four inches (4”) high letters, “WARNING – NO LIFEGUARD ON DUTY” and “RISK OF DROWNING – SUPERVISE CHILDREN CLOSELY”.

Where a pool slide is provided:

  • Rules shall be posted at the entrance of the slide that state the following:
    • Risk of Illness and Injury:
      • Running, standing, kneeling, rotating, tumbling, or stopping in any flume or tunnel.
      • Rough playing on the slide or feature.
      • Diving or flipping while exiting from a flume or feature.
      • Use of the slide while under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
      • Use of the flume or feature by more than one person at a time.
      • Failure to obey the instructions of the pool attendant or lifeguard.
      • Failure to keep hands inside the flume while using the slide.
      • Failure to leave the falling-entry pool promptly after exiting from the slide.
      • The possession of any glass, bottle or food in or near any pool.
      • Entry into an area of grass or other vegetation and returning to slide, feature or pool.
      • The possession of any loose objects.
      • The use of any clothing other than the swimwear on the slide or feature.
      • Wearing any bracelet, watch, or other jewelry.

If the pool is a spa/whirlpool:

  • Rules shall be posted at or near the spa that state the following:
    • Risk of Fetus Damage. Hot water exposure limitations vary from person to person. Pregnant women and small children should not use spa without medical approval.
    • Risk of Drowning. Other persons suffering from heart disease, diabetes, high or low blood pressure, and other health problems should not enter the spa without medical approval.
    • Risk of Drowning. Do not use the spa while under the influence of alcohol, narcotics, or drugs that cause sleepiness and drowsiness or raise/lower blood pressure.
    • Risk of Drowning. Use caution when bathing alone. Overexposure to hot water may cause nausea, dizziness, and fainting. Lower water temperatures are recommended for young children and for extended use (more than10-15 minutes).
    • Risk of Drowning. Do not use or operate spa if the suction fitting is missing, broken, or loose.
    • Risk of Child Drowning. Unsupervised use by children is prohibited. Children under five shall not use the spa.
    • Risk of Injury. Check spa temperature before entering. The spa temperature should not exceed 104°F.
    • Risk of Injury. Enter and exit slowly.
    • Risk of Injury. Keep all glass and breakable objects out of the spa area.
    • Risk of Shock. Never place electrical appliances (telephone, radio, or televisions) within five feet of the spa.

While a fecal, vomitus, or blood contamination incident can present a health hazard to bathers in the immediate vicinity of the incident, the potential for disease transmission may be reduced by implementing the following procedures at your pool:

  • Discourage bathers from entering the pool if they have suffered from gastrointestinal illness related diarrhea in the past two weeks.
  • Encourage bathers to use the toilet and wash their hands with soap and water before using the pool.  Take children on frequent bathroom breaks.
  • Encourage bathers to always shower before entering the pool or before reentering the pool after using the toilet.
  • Require that children who are not yet potty-trained and incontinent bathers wear swimsuit diapers and tight-fitting rubber or plastic pants.  Keep in mind that even though rubber pants and swimsuit diapers can contain most fecal accidents, they may not be completely effective (i.e., improperly sized, become stretched or torn, etc.). Immediately remove the child or incontinent bather from the pool and pool area if defecation occurs.
  • Do not permit diaper changing in the pool area and prohibit the practice of dipping a child’s bottom in the pool as part of the diaper changing process.  If possible, install diaper changing tables in bather accessible bathrooms.
  • Encourage bathers to avoid swallowing pool water.
  • Ensure all pool personnel are properly trained in the prevention and management of pool water fecal, vomitus, or blood incidents.
  • Evacuate and close the pool immediately in the event of vomitus or fecal contamination.  Also, refer to the CDC’s Fecal Incident Response Recommendations for Aquatic Staff for guidance.
  • Ensure that your pool water is balanced and tested frequently, and that a minimum free chlorine residual of 1.0 ppm (2.0 ppm for pools using stabilized chlorine, and 3.0 ppm for spas) is maintained.  Maintain the pH between 7.2 -7.8.  Do not operate the pool if the filtration or disinfection systems are not in proper working order.
  • Ensure that the pool, pool piping, deck, and deck piping are properly designed to prevent gray water, wastewater, or sewage from backing up or draining into the pool. Ensure proper back-flow prevention devices are installed on potable water lines and that they are in good, working condition.
  • Discourage bathers from sharing items, like towels or razors, with other people.
  • Encourage bathers with skin infections to stay out of the pool. If that is not possible, encourage the bather to cover any bumps, cuts, or infected areas with water tight bandages.
  • Do not allow pets in the pool area, and try to prevent wild animals from using the pool as a water source.
  • When incidents of contamination occur, log all information documenting what actions were taken to correct the situation in the pool’s daily records.
The CDC recently updated their Fecal Incident Response Recommendations, so please discontinue using any Cobb & Douglas Public Health handouts related to fecal accident response.  Moving forward, our agency will only provide direct links to CDC recommendations for remediating fecal, vomit, blood, and bodily fluid related incidents.  The latest recommendations can be found at the following links:

If you are unsure of how to proceed with treating your pool after a contamination incident, please feel free to contact your local Environmental Health office for guidance.

  •  Cobb Environmental Health: 770-435-7815
  •  Douglas Environmental Health: 770-920-7311

On December 19, 2007, the Virginia Graeme Baker (VGB) Pool and Spa Safety Act was signed into law by President George W. Bush. The purpose of this law was to help prevent swimming pool suction entrapment/entanglement injuries and deaths by developing a new standard for main drain grates along with a requirement for all public pools to install these new grates by December 19, 2008.

For existing pools with dual main drains, compliance can be achieved by installing, as per manufacturer instructions, a VGB compliant grate on each drain. Grates meeting the new standard will be permanently marked with “ASME/ANSI A112.19.8-2007” or any successor standard and may also be marked with “VGB-2008.”

Additional information marked on the grate shall include a maximum flow rate, an approximate grate life, and the manufacturer’s name and model number. Single main drain pools must correctly install a VGB compliant grate and a secondary method of protection to prevent entrapment/entanglement.

Acceptable forms of secondary protection include the following:

  • Safety vacuum release system (SVRS)
  • Suction limiting vent system
  • Gravity drainage system
  • Automatic pump shut off system
  • This secondary layer of protection may be waived for a single main drain pool if a VGB compliant grate that is at least 18” x 23” or larger is installed.

It is the pool owner’s responsibility to comply with the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act. The Act empowers the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) with the enforcement of this new law and also gives the CPSC the ability to fine pool owners for noncompliance and close the pool until compliance is obtained.

Even though Cobb & Douglas Public Health will not be the primary enforcement agency for the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act, we will require that pools approved for construction or renovation on or after December 19, 2008 install VGB compliant grates. Also, swimming pools wishing to install VGB compliant grates must obtain a modification permit from the department prior to their installation to assure compliance with the Cobb & Douglas Public Health Rules and Regulations for Swimming Pools.

Cobb & Douglas Public Health strongly recommends compliance by December 19, 2008 for pools operating year round and by the 2009 opening date for seasonal pools. By meeting this deadline, you will not only comply with a federal law, but also assure a safer recreational environment for the bathers utilizing your swimming pool.

Additional resources:

If you are planning to build a residential swimming pool on property that is served by an on-site sewage management system (i.e., a septic tank), it is required that you obtain a Residential Swimming Pool Construction Permit from our department prior to beginning construction.  The purpose of this permit is to ensure that the installation of the swimming pool does not have a negative impact on your existing septic system or your ability to adequately repair the system in the future.

A health department permit is not required if your swimming pool will be located on property that is serviced by a county or municipal sanitary sewer system.

Requirements for obtaining a Residential Swimming Pool Construction Permit can be found here.

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Travel Health Services at Cobb & Douglas Public Health (CDPH) was created to protect clients traveling to foreign countries from vaccine preventable diseases and Malaria. Although other vaccines may be recommended when traveling to other countries, the only vaccine required by International Health Regulations is yellow fever vaccination.  It is our mission to assist clients in traveling abroad safely and to remain in good health.

Travel Health Services offers a wide-range of services that provides clients traveling to foreign countries, with the necessary resources and vaccines for a safe and healthy trip. Services include:

  •  A thorough review of clients immunizations and medical history
  • Personalized vaccine recommendations based on clients trip itinerary
  • Administer required and recommended vaccines to clients traveling to foreign countries
  • Provide Malaria Prophylaxis to clients traveling to areas where they are at risk of acquiring Malaria
  • Client Counseling which provides clients with information about food, water and insect precautions based on the clients destination

Yellow Fever vaccination is the only vaccine required by International Health Regulations when traveling to certain countries. Other vaccines will be recommended during your appointment, based on your destination and medical history, to protect you from illnesses present in other countries. Below you will find a list of common vaccines administered to clients traveling to other countries (Please click the links for more information):

Yes, appointments are needed for all Travel Health Services. We have three locations to serve you. Please call one of our Travel Health Clinics listed below to schedule an appointment:

Marietta Public Health Center
1650 County Services Parkway
Marietta, Georgia 30008
770-514-2485

Douglas Public Health Center
6770 Selman Drive
Douglasville, Georgia 30134
770-949-1970

East Cobb Public Health Center
4958 Lower Roswell Road, Suite 120
Marietta, Georgia 30068
678-784-2180

The Travel Health Clinic offers services to clients traveling out of the county. The goal of the Travel Health Clinic is to provide clients traveling to foreign countries with the necessary resources and vaccines for a safe and healthy trip. All other clients needing routine vaccines are seen in the Immunization Clinic. Unlike the Travel Health Clinic, you do not have to have an appointment to be seen in the Immunization Clinic. For more information on the Immunization Clinic, please click here.

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Tuberculosis, commonly referred to as TB, is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This bacterial disease usually attacks the lungs but, can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain. If not treated properly, TB disease can be fatal.

Symptoms of TB include: fever, weight loss, hemoptysis (coughing up blood), and weakness or fatigue.  If you experience two or more symptoms over an extended period of time, please contact your healthcare provider. (NOTE: These symptoms can also be associated with other illnesses.)

To get tested for TB, please contact:

TB Clinic
Marietta Health Center – Building B
1738 County Services Parkway
Marietta, Georgia 30008
770-514-2362

No, a positive reaction to the TST indicates that at some point in time you were exposed to someone with active tuberculosis.

Schools and employers will sometimes require this test to determine if you have been exposed to tuberculosis prior to enrollment or employment.

Yes, we do provide most services to residents of other counties, including but not limited to, TST, chest x-rays and x-ray interpretations. Please contact your local health department for more information on services offered to residents of other counties.

Currently, Cobb & Douglas Public Health accepts these commercial insurance providers.

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Vital records, as defined by the Georgia Department of Public Health, are birth, death, fetal deaths (stillbirth), induced termination of pregnancy, marriage and divorce certificates and reports.

Vital records are completed in the county where the event occurred:

  • Birth Certificates: The majority of birth records are generated by hospital staff.
  • Death Certificates: Death Certificates are completed by funeral directors and certifying physicians, except in the case of coroner investigations where the coroner certifies the manner of death.
  • Marriage Applications and Licenses: Marriage applications and licenses are completed by probate judges and marriage officials.
  • Divorce Report: Reports of divorce are completed by the Clerks of the Superior Courts.

*Original records, except marriage and divorce reports, are filed at the state office of vital records.

Home Births can be filed in the County Vital Records office by APPOINTMENT ONLY, Please call to schedule an appointment 770-514-2394 or 770-514-2395. A home birth packet can be mailed to the parents upon request. Generally, appointments are scheduled between 8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.

In Georgia, only certain people are entitled to a certified copy of a birth/death certificate. According to Georgia law and the Department of Human Resources, the person(s) entitled to a certificate is:

  • The person named on the certificate
  • The parents listed on the certificate
  • The authorized legal guardian or agent of person on certificate
  • The living legal spouse or next of kin or legal representative of person on certificate
  • The court of competent jurisdiction, upon order or subpoena
  • Any governmental agency, state or federal, provided that such certificate is needed for official purposes
  • Death certificates with a cause of death will only be issued to the IMMEDIATE next of kin. Certificates WITHOUT the cause can be issued to others with VALID ID.

In order to obtain a certified copy of a birth/death certificate you must provide the appropriate fee and a signed request that includes the following information:

  • Full name of the person
  • Date of death or birth (month, day, year)
  • Place of death or birth(city, county)
  • Photocopy of ID

Fees

  • Search fee (includes one certified copy, if the record is found on file): $25.00
  • Additional certifications of same record ordered at the same time: $5.00

Paternity Acknowledgment

The Paternity Acknowledgment (PA) document has two main purposes:

  • To add a father to a child’s birth record,
  • To further efforts to legitimate the relationship between the father and the child.

Once filed with the State Office of Vital Records, the PA helps establish the father and child relationship. It is a voluntary agreement between the mother and the biological father to add the father’s name to the birth record. The child’s name can also be changed if agreed upon by both mother and father.

A PA cannot be used if the mother of the child was married to anyone within 10 months prior to the birth of this child or, if for any other reason, there is another father listed on this child’s birth certificate. If the mother was married during this time frame, or if another father is listed on the birth record, court action will be necessary to establish paternity, amend the birth record, and establish legitimation.

For more information, see http://www.health.state.ga.us/programs/vitalrecords/ or contact:

State Office of Vital Records
1680 Phoenix Boulevard
Suite 100
Atlanta, GA 30349

State Office Hours:
Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Call Center Information:
(404) 679-4702
Hours: 
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Putative Father Registry

The Putative Father Registry is a list of the names of men who have either declared paternity of a child, or indicated the possibility of paternity.

Registry allows possible biological (not legal) fathers to provide identifying information about themselves, the mother, and the child so that these men can be notified about adoption proceedings.  The possible biological father is encouraged to place his name in the Registry as soon as possible after engaging in a sexual relationship with a woman who is not his legal wife where such union could result in the birth of a child, preferably registering before the child is born.

In order to register, a man should complete the Putative Father Registry Registration Form (no. 3960) which can be obtained in person at the Cobb Public Health, Vital Records Office at the address below:

Cobb County Public Health Vital Records Office
1650 County Services Parkway
Marietta, Georgia 30008
(770) 514-2337 (Vital Records Office)
Monday – Friday: 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Birth certificates may be purchased at any County Vital Records office in the state of Georgia. See below for Cobb and Douglas counties Vital Records information:

Cobb County:
Cobb County Public Health
Vital Records Office
1650 County Services Parkway
Marietta, Georgia 30008
(770) 514-2337 (Vital Records Office)
Monday – Friday 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

State and Federal Holidays Are Observed

Douglas County:
Douglas County Probate Court
Vital Records Office
8700 Hospital Drive
Douglasville, Georgia 30134
(770) 920-7249 (Vital Records Office)
Monday – Friday 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

State and Federal Holidays Are Observed

Cobb County Public Health (Marietta Health Center)
Vital Records Office
1650 County Services Parkway
Marietta, Georgia 30008
(770) 514-2337 (Vital Records Office)
Monday – Friday: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

State and Federal Holidays Are Observed

Douglas County Probate Court
Vital Records Office
8700 Hospital Drive
Douglasville, Georgia 30134
(770) 920-7249 (Vital Records Office)
Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

State and Federal Holidays Are Observed

To make corrections to a birth certificate, you must:

  • Obtain a certified copy of the birth certificate from the state vital records office.
  • Submit a written request detailing the desired changes. An additional fee of $10 will be required to make the change. *Note: There is no fee for current year corrections. There is fee for over 1 year of age.
  • Requests should be mailed to:
    • Vital Records (Changes Unit)

      1680 Phoenix Boulevard
      Suite 100
      Atlanta, Georgia 30349
      (404) 679-4702

No information will be provided by telephone for instructions/procedures for change. A review of the record must be made to provide proper instructions/procedures for your individual certificate.

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The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, commonly referred to as WIC, provides nutrition education and supplemental foods to low income families.  Participants receive a nutrition assessment, health screening, medical history, body measurements (weight and height), hemoglobin check, nutrition education, breastfeeding support, referrals to other health and social services, and vouchers for healthy foods.

WIC serves pregnant, breastfeeding, or postpartum women, infants, and children under five years of age who meet the following:

  • Income level has to be less than or equal to 185% of poverty guidelines
  • Nutrition risk must be documented

Those eligible may receive WIC services even if they are working, are under the care of a private physician, and/or have private insurance. To determine eligibility, clients must provide proof of ID, proof of residency, and proof of income or Medicaid/food stamp enrollment.

The WIC income eligibility guidelines change annually.

The following poverty guidelines are valid for fiscal year 2014 (July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014)

GEORGIA WIC PROGRAM 
INCOME ELIGIBLE GUIDELINES 
(Effective from July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016) 
Reduced Price Meals – 185% of Federal Poverty Guidelines 
48 Contiguous States

Household  SizeAnnualMonth!yTwice-monthlyBi-weeklyWeekly
1
$21,978
$1,832
$916
$846
$423
2$29,637
$2,470
$1,235
$1,140
$570
3$37,296$3,108$1,554
$1,435$718
4$44,955$3,747$1,874
$1,730$865
5$52,614$4,385$2,193$2,024$1,012
6$60,273$5,023$2,512
$2,319$1,160
7$67,951$5,663$2,832$2,614$1,307
8$75,647$6,304$3,152$2,910$1,455
9$83,343$6,946$3,473$3,206$1,603
10$91,039$7,587$3,794$3,502$1,751
11$98,735$8,228$4,114$3,798$1,899
12$106,431$8,870$4,435$4,094$2,047
13$114,127$9,511$4,756$4,390$2,195
14$121,823$10,152$5,076$4,686$2,343
15$129,519$10,794$5,397$4,982$2,491
16$137,215$11,435$5,718$5,278
$2,639
Each Add'l Family
Member, add
+$7,696+$642+$321+$296+$148

Revised 04/2016
For up to date information, please check the following link: https://www.fns.usda.gov/wic/wic-eligibility-requirements

There are many different kinds of GA WIC appointments.  Each different service has a different appointment type.  Expectations for each type of appointment will be different.  Some things that may happen include:

  • Complete a questionnaire about what you and/or your children eat.
  • Submit Proof of Income, Proof of Residency and Proof of Identification.
  • Height and weight check of you and/or your children
  • Finger stick for Hemoglobin status (Some people call this Iron Status)
  • Meet with a nutritionist to go over your answers to the questionnaire, answer questions you may have about growth and development, nutrition, physical activity, and other healthy lifestyle issues and assist with referrals.
  • Create lifestyle change goals with your nutritionist
  • Receive vouchers for healthy foods and instruction in how to use those vouchers.
  • Receive an appointment for your next GA WIC Visit

The items needed for your WIC appointment will vary, depending on the type of appointment you have scheduled for that day. Below you will find a few general rules:

  • Regardless of what type of appointment you have scheduled, you should always bring your WIC ID folder.
  • For all Children Certification Appointments, the applicant must bring Proof of Income, Proof of Residency (street address in Georgia), and an Identification Card for the parent/guardian and an Identification Card for the child. NOTE: For Child Certification Appointments, both the parent/guardian and child must be present.
  • For all Women’s Certification Appointments, you must bring Proof of Income, Proof of Residency (street address in Georgia), and an Identification Card. NOTE: For Women’s Certification Appointments, the applicant must be present.
  • For Nutrition classes, the participant may need to attend. Please refer to your personalized WIC ID folder (Appointment Section) for more information.
  • For Prevent Anemia classes, the participant or proxy may attend.
  • For Breastfeeding classes, the participant or proxy may attend.

  • Prenatal women stay in the WIC program until six weeks postpartum.
  • Postpartum women may continue (if still eligible) until six months postpartum.
  • Breastfeeding women may remain on the program for as long as one year after delivery (if they continue to breastfeed).
  • Infants may remain on the WIC program until their first birthday.
  • Children may be eligible for WIC up to five years of age. They must be reassessed for income eligibility annually.

A “30 Day Form” means you have 30 days from the date received to bring the missing proof/documentation to your local WIC clinic. Please see your personalized WIC ID Folder (Appointment Section) for more information. When a participant receives a “30 Day Form,” the participant is eligible to receive only one month of vouchers. Once the missing proof/documentation is received by the WIC clinic, the participant will be able to pick-up the next month’s vouchers. The participant may bring missing proof/documentation to the WIC clinic during normal business hours. The proof/documentation must be received on or before the 30 day expiration date; however, if you miss your appointment to bring your proof information, please call our call center (770-514-2389) who will work with you to get back on the program without restarting the process.

A proxy is a trusted person designated by a GA WIC participant or the participant’s guardian, to attend some GA WIC services when the participant or guardian is unable to attend. Proxies may also pickup vouchers and cash them in the store for the participant.  Proxies must follow all the rules and regulations of a GA WIC participant; they also have additional rules to follow.  The proxy may only be selected by the participant or participant’s guardian at a primary WIC visit also called the certification visit.  A proxy must have both their personal identification, and their GA WIC ID folder to access services.

WIC participants are given a 15 minute grace period after the scheduled appointment time. If you are more than 15 minutes late, you will be required to reschedule your appointment for a later time.

Currently, Cobb & Douglas Public Health accepts these commercial insurance providers.

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Zika virus disease is caused by the Zika virus, which is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting up to a week, and many people do not have symptoms or will have only mild symptoms. However, Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause a serious birth defect called microcephaly and other severe brain defects.

Zika is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus). A pregnant woman can pass Zika to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth. Also, a person with Zika can pass it to his or her sex partners. We encourage people who have traveled to or live in places with risk of Zika to protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites and sexual transmission of Zika.

Many people infected with Zika will have no symptoms or mild symptoms that last several days to a week. However, Zika infection during pregnancy can cause a serious birth defect called microcephaly and other severe fetal brain defects. Current research suggests that Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an uncommon sickness of the nervous system, is strongly associated with Zika; however, only a small proportion of people with recent Zika virus infection get GBS.

Once someone has been infected with Zika, it’s very likely they’ll be protected from future infections. There is no evidence that past Zika infection poses an increased risk of birth defects in future pregnancies

No. Pregnant women should not travel to any area with risk of Zika. Travelers who go to places with risk of Zika can be infected with Zika, and Zika infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly and other severe brain defects.

Travelers who go to places with risk of Zika can be infected with Zika, and CDC has issued travel recommendations for people traveling to those areas. Many people will have mild or no symptoms. However, Zika can cause microcephaly and other severe birth defects. For this reason, pregnant women should not travel to any area with risk of Zika, and women trying to get pregnant should talk to their doctors before traveling or before their sex partners travel. It is especially important that women who wish to delay or avoid pregnancy consistently use the most effective method of birth control that they are able to use. Those traveling to areas with risk of Zika should take steps during and after they travel to prevent mosquito bites and sexual transmission of Zika.

The best way to prevent Zika is to protect yourself and your family from mosquito bites:

Zika can be spread by a person infected with Zika to his or her sex partners. Condoms can reduce the chance of getting Zika from sex. Condoms include male and female condoms.  To be effective, condoms should be used from start to finish, every time during vaginal, anal, and oral sex and the sharing of sex toys. Not having sex eliminates the risk of getting Zika from sex. Pregnant couples with a partner who traveled to or lives in an area with risk of Zika should use condoms every time they have sex or not have sex during the pregnancy.

The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, headache, joint pain, red eyes, and muscle pain. Many people infected with Zika won’t have symptoms or will have mild symptoms, which can last for several days to a week.

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